Getting out of the closet: Scientific authorship of literary fiction and knowledge transfer

Some scientists write literary fiction books in their spare time. If these books contain scientific knowledge, literary fiction becomes a mechanism of knowledge transfer. When this is the case, in the framework of the distinction of formal versus informal knowledge transfer, we conceptualize literary fiction as non-formal knowledge transfer. We model knowledge transfer as a function of the type of scientist (academic or non-academic) and the field of science.

Innovation from science: the role of network content and legitimacy ties

This study contributes to advance understanding on the micro-level foundations of the relationship between scientific research and innovation. We adopt a relational approach to scientific research networks through the analysis of the content of network ties, in contrast to more standard network approaches which are grounded on structural features of networks. We argue that the perceived legitimacy afforded through ties within research networks play a critical role in reconciling the conflicting logics of science and innovation.

Sourcing Upstream or Downstream? Exploring Knowledge-based Antecedents of Academic Entrepreneurship and Technology Transfer

This paper examines two contrasting knowledge-based antecedents of entrepreneurship and technology transfer among scientists in public research institutions. ‘Upstream knowledge sources’, which refer to insights for commercial opportunities gained as a result of high impact scientific contributions; and ‘downstream knowledge sources’, which refer to knowledge gained through researchers’ direct interactions with research beneficiaries. We find that downstream sources are associated with the two commercialization pathways examined: i.e.

Sourcing Upstream or Downstream? Exploring Knowledge-based Antecedents of Academic Entrepreneurship and Technology Transfer

This paper examines two contrasting knowledge-based antecedents of entrepreneurship and technology transfer among scientists in public research institutions. ‘Upstream knowledge sources’, which refer to insights for commercial opportunities gained as a result of high impact scientific contributions; and ‘downstream knowledge sources’, which refer to knowledge gained through researchers’ direct interactions with research beneficiaries. We find that downstream sources are associated with the two commercialization pathways examined: i.e.

The value of PhDs for low-tech labour markets

Academic organisations do not have the resources to hire the increasing number of PhD graduates that universities are producing each year. Non-academic organisations are thus becoming an important and growing employment niche for these highly skilled and qualified individuals. However, little is currently known about how and why PhDs are valued by labour markets, or how PhDs are contributing to the contextualised problems and challenges of non-academic organisations.

Towards more inclusive S&T indicators: a review on efforts to improve STI measurements in ‘peripheral’ spaces

S&T systems all over the world are routinely monitored and assessed with indicators that were created to measure the natural sciences. These S&T indicators are often inappropriate in other contexts: conventional S&T databases may not include data from low and middle income countries, less prevailing disciplines, and research addressing the problems of socially excluded groups. We review effort being made to create data and indicators that better reflect research activities and contributions in these “peripheral” spaces.

The application of the "universal" excellence in "peripheral" countries

This paper explores the application of “excellence” policies in “peripheral” contexts, that is, in geographical, cognitive or social spaces that are somehow marginal to or marginalised from the centres of scientific activity. The discourse on excellence rests on the implicit assumption that there is an objective property of research, quality or excellence, which can be universally captured. However, the universal “gold standards” for excellence are taken from research carried out in prestigious centres of academic activity, generally in most developed countries and regions.
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