Skills

Regional Human Capital and University Orientation: A case study on Spain

This paper explores the relationship between regional human capital (HC) and the processes of knowledge creation and mobilization due to Higher Education Institutions (HEIs). Although the nexus between these dimensions emerges frequently in both the scholarly and policy discourses, no study has so far investigated explicitly how their connection works. Using occupations as a proxy for the skill content of jobs, we analyse individual (gender, schooling and age) and regional (university orientation) factors that influence HC employment structure in Spanish regions over the period 2003-2010.

A Taxonomy of Multi-Industry Labour Force Skills

This paper proposes an empirical study of the skill repertoires of 290 sectors in the United States over the period 2002-2011. We use information on employment structures and job content of occupations to flesh out structural characteristics of industry-specific know-how. The exercise of mapping the skills structures embedded in the workforce yields a taxonomy that discloses novel nuances on the organization of industry. In so doing we also take an initial step towards the integration of labour and employment in the area of innovation studies.

An analysis of the knowledge base of Scientific Research & Development Business Services

It is argued that the literature on SR&D outsourcing focuses mostly on client firms, that is, the demand side, while little is known of the characteristics of the supplying sector. The present paper tackles this gap by elaborating an exploratory analysis of this business service sector with a view to analyse the main patterns of specialization and their evolution over time. Using data on job content and skill requirements in the United States we explore how different forms of knowledge co-exist and co-evolve within a changing sector.

That was then, this is now: Skills and Routinization in the 2000s

We analyze changes in the skill content of occupations in US four-digit manufacturing industries between 1999 and 2010. Following a ‘task-based’ approach, we elaborate a measure of Non-Routine skill intensity that captures the effects of industry exposure to both technology and international trade. The paper adds to previous literature by focusing on both the determinants of demand for Non-Routine skills and their effects on industry productivity and wages.
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